Changes at Buffalo for 1910


At Buffalo
by John C. Mesmer

With the hope of adding more stimulus to motorboat racing for next season, the directors of the Buffalo Launch Club, at a recent meeting, fired the first gun toward divorce from the present Interlake Yachting Association.

The idea is to form a new association eliminating sailing craft, thus making it strictly a motorboat organization.

The Interlake Yachting Association was formed a number of years ago, before motorboating came into existence as a popular sport. It was composed principally of sailboat owners, and there being no other organization among the few motorboat enthusiasts, they naturally drifted into the same rut with the sailboat men. The racing rules were laid down by these same men, and the motorboat owners being in the minority, they had to take just what was handed them, and sometimes it wasnít pleasant.

Now, however, times have changed. The motorboats have increased in number, while sailing has declined, until motorboats surpass the latter craft ten or twenty to one. Consequently motorboat owners, in Buffalo especially, feel that they have outgrown the parent organization, and that they are big enough and numerous enough to shift for themselves, and, above all, to have harmony.

It is for these reasons that the directors of the Buffalo Launch Club have taken the initiative with the end in view of perfecting an organization embracing all the motorboat clubs along the Great Lakes and especially those between Detroit and Buffalo.

Representatives from the interested motorboat clubs will congregate for a meeting during the Motorboat and Sportsmanís Show, which will be held in Buffalo on March 21st to 30th, when it is likely that a new organization will be born.

(Transcribed from MotorBoat, Feb. 10, 1910, p. 36)

[Thanks to Greg Calkins for help in preparing this page --LF]


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