1959 Harmsworth Trophy
Detroit River, Detroit, Michigan, August 25-27, 1959


Canada 4th Nation To Hold Trophy
By Ken Williams

bullet Harmsworth Bid Due for Maverick
bullet Maverick's Driver Confidant
bullet Engine Error Gives Canada Lead
bullet Sad Stead is Ready to 'Open Up'
bullet Victory Drive Began in 1951
bullet US Loss Good for Boating
bullet Canada 4th Nation
bullet Maverick Crew Grim in Defeat
bullet Harmsworth Trophy won by Canada
bullet Statistics

Miss Supertest IIIís Harmsworth Trophy victory for Canada yesterday enabled a fourth country to hold the coveted prize in the powerboat racing classicís 56-year history.

England claimed the first victory in 1903 and repeated in 1905, 1906, 1912 and 1913. France won in 1904. The United States won the title in four pre-World War I years, 1907-08-10-11, and then Gar Wood and his Miss Americas reigned from 1920 through 1933, with one exception in 1931 when his brother, George, prevailed with Miss America VIII.

The U.S. maintained Harmsworth supremacy for 39 unbroken years with additional victories by Stanley Dollarís Skip-A-Long in 1949, Stan Sayresí Slo-Mo-Shun IV in 1950 and William Waggoner Jr.ís Shanty I in 1956.

Maverickís unsuccessful bid yesterday was the 13th defense of the title by a U.S. boat. The Canadian boatís victory was sweet revenge for Miss Supertest IIIís owner, Jim Thompson, of London, Ont., whose Miss Supertest II lost to Shanty I. Waggoner also is owner of the Maverick.

In 1903 Alfred Harmsworth, the famous newspaper publisher, later to become Lord Northcliffe, put up the huge plaque and declared it the worldís symbol for motorboat supremacy.

Napier I won the Harmsworth inaugural at Queenstown, Ireland, with an average speed of 18 knots (19.53 miles an hour). S. F. Edge was the owner-driver. The second event was held at Cowes and Trefle-AQuatre, the French competitor, though badly beaten, entered a protest and was awarded the cup. In the third contest, Napier II, the British challenger, proved superior to her French rival and the trophy returned to England.

U.S. Lost Debut

In 1906 U.S. filed its first challenge and it proved unsuccessful. The boat, the Challenger, guided by W. Gould Brokaw, was beaten by two minutes arid 16 seconds over a

[text missing]

Back To England

Three more boats named Dixie won the next three events on Huntington Bay, Long Isand, but this string ended in 1912.

That year saw the trophy go back to England in possession of E. Mackay-Edgar for winning with Maple Leaf IV, which triumphed again in 1913.

Then World War I suspended racing until 1920, when Wood went over to Osborne Bay, England, to win with Miss America I in the new record speed of 61.51 m.p.h.

Wood was unbeatable in a succession of Miss Americas in 1921, 1926, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1932 and finally in Miss America X in 1933. His brother, George, won the controversial 1931 contest.

3 Canadian Failures

The next challenge was to come from Canada. This was in 1949 after a lapse of 16 years when R. Stanley Dollar Jr., of Lake Tahoe, won after beating Harold Wilson, of Ingersoll, Ont.

Again the Wilson family challenged in 1950 with their Miss Canada IV, which lasted only one of the required two races. Lou Fageol in Stanley Sayresí Slo-Mo-Shun IV triumphed 1under the colors of the Seattle Yacht Club.

The last challenge before Miss Supertest IIIís victory yesterday occurred in 1956 when Waggonerís Shanty, driven by Col. Russell Schleeh, was victorious over Thompsonís first effort in his earlier Supertest. The Canadian driver was Bill Braden, who later was killed in a speedboat accident.

* * *

Harmsworth Races

Year

Boat

Speed

Nation

1903

Napier I

19.53

England

1904

Trefle-A-Quatre

26.63

France

1905

Napier II

26.03

England

1906

Yarrow-Napier

15.48

England

1907

Dixie I

31.78

U.S.

1908

Dixie II

31.347

U.S.

1910

Dixie III

36.04

U.S.

1911

Dixie IV

40.28

U.S.

1912

Maple Leaf IV

43.18

England

1913

Maple Leaf IV

57.45

England

1920

Miss America I

61.51

U.S.

1921

Miss America II

59.75

U.S.

1926

Miss America V

61.118

U.S.

1928

Miss America VII

59.325

U.S.

1929

Miss America VIII

75.287

U.S.

1930

Miss America IX

77.233

U.S.

1931

Miss America VIII

85.861

U.S.

1932

Miss America X

78.489

U.S.

1933

Miss America X

86.939

U.S.

1949

Skip-A-Long

94.285

U.S.

1950

Slo-Mo-Shun IV

95.623

U.S.

1956

Shanty I

89.750

U.S.

1959

Miss Supertest III

104.098

Canada

(Reprinted from The Detroit News, August 28, 1959)


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