1907 Monaco Regatta
Monte Carlo, Monaco, April 1-16, 1907


Monaco
Record Breaking Performances in All Classes Cause Doubts of Accuracy of Course
British Comment Outspoken

Entries for the Monaco Meeting
Monaco
The Monaco Fiasco
The Racing at Monte Carlo
The Fourth Annual Motor Boat Exhibition and Races at Monaco
The Monaco Motor Boat Races
Automobilism
Marine Motoring
Monaco Records

The fourth Monaco meeting is over, and for the first time in the history of that greatest event in motorboating, doubt has been thrown upon their accuracy of the times recorded. So great was the lowering of records in all classes, despite generally unfavorable weather conditions, that the impression that the course was short was generally voiced early in the meeting. The English yachting journals, in their accounts of the racing, make comparisons between the records of the recent meeting and those made in past years, and also call attention to the remarkable apparent improvement made by well-known boats, such as La Rapiere II, which had competed in previous years, and whose speeds were pretty well known. The Monaco correspondent of The Motor Boat, London, comments upon the matter as follows:

"Driven their hardest in dead smooth water, the 12-metre racer Panhard-Tellier and the 8-metre La Rapiere II, which finished respectively first and second in the standing mile and flying kilometre not only failed to achieve any faster times than 2 min. 9 sec. and 2 min. 25 sec. for the miles and 1 min. 16 sec. and 1 min. 20 sec. for the kilometre, but demonstrated beyond all doubt that the "world's records" they were alleged to have made during the previous week were wholly fictitious. For these rates of speed, achieved in the favorable circumstances of the flying kilometre--26 1-3 knots and 25 knots respectively--are not only five knots slower than the "world's records" of 31 1-3 and 30 knots each was alleged to have made, but are even slower than 5easick's and not better than F.I.A.T. XIII's times last year.

"This circumstance, and the fact that even fewer boats than last year were qualified to compete in the standing mile and kilometre event--the others not having completed the full course in their class race through disablement and lack of seaworthiness--not only falsify the results of the entire week, but also all the extravagant statements made as to the general improvement in all classes.

"Not only so, but they positively confirm the contention we advance--namely, that the actual course was much shorter than the 50 kilometres it was supposed to measure. According to the information we have obtained from those who were actually aboard competing boats, it appears to have been something under 45 kilometres, or over a quarter of a mile short on each round. Of course, what is done cannot now be undone; the only thing left is to prevent the recurrence of such a lamentable fiasco; one which we prefer to think arose either from incompetence in those entrusted with laying the course or the effect of a heavy ground swell upon insufficient moorings, and not from any tacit "arrangement" to secure reclame for the French trade at the expense of good faith to the sport of motorboating."

The Marine Motor Journal of London, under the heading "All Results Falsified," is even more outspoken, and expresses its opinion as follows:

"To-day has witnessed a continuation of the record-breaking performances, both in the racing and cruiser classes; indeed, without in any way wishing to detract from the splendid performances of the winners, I cannot help wondering if the course is not shorter than it is officially stated to be. This question has been freely discussed ever since La Rapiere II made her sensational run in the small racing class, it seeming impossible that any amount of tuning up could account for the enormous improvement in her form, though I purposely refrained from making any comment of this nature at the time. Still, the continuance of absolutely phenomenal records in practically every race makes it at least desirable that the course should be remeasured. No one, of course, doubts the good faith of the Racing Committee, who are all of them the soul of honor, but it is at least possible that some of the marks may have dragged their moorings, and re-measurement should at least set all doubts at rest."

The remarkable improvement in speed which has given rise to these suspicions is shown by a comparison of the records of this year with those of a year ago. In the 8-metre class, the winner in 1906 was Antoinette IV, with a speed of 23.34 knots. This year the event was won by La Rapiere II at a speed of 28.95 knots. In the 8 to 12-metre class, Yarrow Napier (now Flying Fish) won at the rate of 13.44 knots; this year's winner, Panhard-Tellier is credited with 29.73 knots. In the Championship of the Sea, Delahaye made 23.12 knots in 1906, and Panhard-Tellier 30.41 knots in 1907.

The cruisers show a proportionate advance in speed. In the class up to 6 1/2 metres Mendelssohn made 12.95 knots in 1906, and Capoulon III made 17.25 knots in 1907. In the class from 6 1/2 to 8 metres, Excelsior VIII made 11.59 knots in 1906, and Mais-Je-Vais-Piguer made 16.44 in 1907. In the class from 8 to 12 metres, Calypse made 18.33 knots in 1906, and Ulvsse 20.61 knots in 1907. In the 12 to 18 metres class, Pampa made 13.22 knots in 1906, and Lorraine 1121.74 knots in 1907. The complete summary of the meeting follows (all speeds in knots):

FIRST DAY, APRIL 8

Class I -- Cruisers up to 6 1 /2 metres. Distance 50 kilometres (31.05 miles). Prize, 7,000 f. ($1,400;

Name

Length

Time

Speed

Capoulou III

21 ft. 9 in.

1.35.55

 

Nautilus Mutel I

 "

1.36.11

 

Gamine

 "

1.39.28

 

Champagne

 "

1.51.56

 

Lanturlu III

 "

1.58.19

 

C. B. II

 "

1.59.47

 

Joliette III

 "

2.38.30

 

Lanturlu II

 "

2.40.07

 

Fleur d'Helice

 "

2.55.52

 

Class I -- Racers up to 8 metres

Course, 50 kilometres Prize, 9,000 f. ($1,800) 

La Rapiere II

26 ft. 3 in.

0.55.55

28.95

Fiat XV

 "

0.57.56

28.1

Sea Sick

 "

1.00.50

26.16

Mouvette

 "

1.59.00

 

SECOND DAY, APRIL 8

Class II -- Cruisers 6 1/2 to 8 metres Distance, 50 kilometres

Mais-Je-Vais-Piquer

26 ft. 3 in.

1.38.24

16.44

Dalifol-Petroleum

21 ft. 7 in.

Not required to finish

Nautilus B. V. Jacqueline

26 ft. 3 in.

Disabled

THIRD DAY, APRIL 9

Class IV -- Cruisers 17 to 18 metres. Distance, 50 kilometres

Lorraine

46 ft. 6 in.

1.14.21

21.7

All 'Erta

40 ft.

1.22.26

19.6

Florentia III

40 ft.

1.24.48

19.0

Hydroplane Class, 10kilometres

Obus-Nautilus

 

18.24

17.5

Motogodille-Glisseur

 

Withdrawn

 

Glisseur-de-Lambert

 

Disabled

 

Class II -- Racers 8 to 18 metres. Distance, 50 kilometres

Panhard-Tellier

40 ft.

0.54.27

29.2

Mercedes D. L.

60 ft.

1.42.56

15.7

Daimler II

40 ft.

Withdrawn

 

Daimler III

40 ft.

"

 

Flving Fish

39 ft. 6 in.

"

 

New-Trefle

36 ft. 3 in.

"

 

Jeanette

40 ft.

"

 

FOURTH DAY, APRIL 10

Class III -- Cruisers 80 to 12 metres. Distance, 50 kilometres

Ulvsse

26 ft. 3 in.

1.18.23

20.61

Galinari II

 "

1.22.10

 

Adele

 "

1.24.25

 

Le Sec

 "

1.27.36

 

Vedette Boats, Distance, 50 kilometres

B. I. Jacqueline III

25 ft.

2.30.12

 

Nautilus B. V. Jacqueline 

 "

2.33.40

 

Nautilus-Mutel

 "

2.49.25

 

Marie Brizard

 "

3.04.16

 

C. B. I

 "

3.10.08

 

Arion-Despujols

 "

3.16.36

 

Martini-Megevet

 "

3.21.21

 

Motobloc

 "

3.29.04

 

FIFTH DAY, APRIL 11

Championship of the Sea

Open to boats which have completed any race of 50 kilometres

Distance, 200 kilometres (124.22 miles)

Panhard-Tellier

40 ft.

3.33.04

30.41

All 'Erta

40 ft.

4.46.24

22.60

Ulvsse

26 ft. 3 in.

4.59.49

21.58

Flyng Fish

39 ft. 6 in.

5.14.13

20.62

Adele

 

5.16.03

20.51

Mercedes D. L.

60 ft.

7.55.00

 

SIXTH DAY, APRIL 14

Handicap for racers, 50 kilo

Start

Finish

Time

Mercedes D. L.

10.30.00

12.06.27

1.36.27

Flying Fish

10.53.00

12.08.36

1.15.02

Seasick

11.00.00

12.15.02

1.15.02

Handicap for cruisers, 50 kilo

Ressac

8.00.00

11.59.02

3.59.02

Roi d'Ys

8.40.00

12.06.10

3.26.10

Pilote 1

8.48.00

12.08.29

3.20.29

Adele

10.44.00

12.09.19

1.25.19

Lally

9.36.00

12.09.48

2.33.48

Standing mile and flying kilometre trials

Cruisers under 8 metres

Mile

Kilometer

Total

Nautilus-Mutel

3.49

2.13

6.02

Nihil

3.55

2.12

6.07

Cruisers over 8 metres

All 'Erta

2.52

1.35

4.27

Despujols-Mutel

2.52

1.42

4.35

Nautilus

2.57

1.44

4.42

Racers under 8 metres

La Rapiere

2.23 2/5

1.25 1/5

3.48 1/5

Racers over 8 metres

Panhard-Tellier

2.19 2/5

1.31 1 /5

3.33 1 /5

Flying Fish

2.43 3/5

1.31 1/5

4.14 4/5

Standing mile and flying kilometre finals

Cruisers

All Erta

2.45

1.44

4.29

Despujols-Mutel

3.28

2.00

5.28

Nautilus-Mutel

3.44

2.18

6.02

Racers

Panhard-Tellier

2.09 4/5

1.16 2/5

3.26 1 /5

La Rapiere II

2.25

1.20 2/5

3.45 2/5

Flying Fish

2.38 4/5

1.35 3/5

4.11 2/5

SEVENTH DAY, APRIL 15

Handicap for cruisers 18.75 metres
Won by Ulysse Time 31 m. 26 s.
Second Nautilus B. V. Jacqueline II Time 37 m. 24 s.
Third Nautilus-Mutel Time 38 m. II s.
Handicap for racers 18.75 metres
Won by Flying Fish Time 46 m. 28 s.

(Transcribed from The Motor Boat, May 10, 1907, pp. 16-20)

[Thanks to Greg Calkins for help in preparing this page. --LF]


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